About Compressor Regulators

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There is quite often a misconception about compressor regulators that we will try to dispel here, as well as giving you lots of information about how to best use your compressed air regulator.

While probably not all, most air compressors that have a tank will come equipped with an air regulator. It is typically located on the discharge line from the tank, upstream from the discharge coupler, which is the coupler into which you plug the connector on your air hose. Depending on the make and model of your air compressor, your compressor regulator will look something like the one in the image.

Fix My Compressor - About Compressed Air Regulators

Your compressor regulator may be a different color. Your regulator may be bigger or smaller,  it may have a smaller or larger air gauge or the air gauge may not even be directly attached to the regulator, your regulator adjustment knob may look different, yet all air regulators are basically similar in function to the one shown.

Using Compressor Regulators

Using the regulator is pretty straightforward. If you turn the regulator adjustment knob in a clockwise direction, that normally elevates the regulator pressure setting. Turn the knob counter-clockwise and the regulator setting is reduced.

Whatever pressure is displayed on the regulator gauge – not the tank gauge since your compressor typically has two gauges – is the pressure of the air stream exiting the discharge coupler into your air hose.

Some regulator adjustment knobs lock by either depressing them or pulling them out. If you find that you cannot turn the regulator adjustment knob, try pushing down on it or pulling it up. If it has a built-in adjustment lock, that should unlock it.

About Compressor Regulators Misconception

The most significant misconception about compressor regulators is that they can raise the air pressure!

If your tank pressure is 100 PSI for example, you can increase the discharge pressure by turning the knob in a clockwise direction. If you try to dial the pressure up past the tank pressure of 100 PSI the regulator gauge needle will stop at and display the tank pressure of 100 PSI, and that’s the pressure that will be exiting the discharge coupler to the air hose.

The air regulator can only adjust pressure down. No air regulator can adjust the pressure up past whatever the pressure is in the tank or air mains.

What Good Are Regulators Then?

The compressed air regulator is an important device. Why? Because it allows you to dial the pressure down to the the absolute minimum required by the air tool you are trying to operate.

Running your air tool at the minimum operating pressure extends the life of the air tool, reduces the amount of air used – which cuts down on energy cost to compress the air – and reduces the cycle frequency of the air compressor, which has positive ramifications for the compressor life and maintenance cycle.

Always adjust the air regulator pressure setting to the minimum pressure level required to operate any of your air tools.

Can You Have Multiple Air Regulators?

Absolutely you can. Many industrial plants plumb their compressed air up to a ceiling mounted air main that circulates the plant. The air pressure in the air main is typically the highest pressure that the plant compressor can generate.

Drop lines are installed from the air main down to the shop floor to supply compressed air to various pieces of equipment. Each machine or piece of equipment may have a different minimum operating pressure, so there will be a regulator (and typically a filter too) installed just before each piece of equipment so that the pressure can be set to the optimal performance level.

So too, in your home shop you can adjust the pressure for your air line on the regulator in the discharge line from the tank, and if desired, you can install air regulators anywhere else in the line to be able to further adjust the air pressure if you have multiple uses of compressed air.

Compressor Regulator Maintenance

For most of us DIY type folks with home or small shop air compressors, the regulator that came with the compressor will be a cheap one, mass produced in some foreign land for pennies each, and sold to the compressor assemblers for not much more than that, we expect.

The diaphragm inside the regulator upon which the compressed air presses to control the downstream pressure will crack in time, through high cycle exposure, from contamination of the diaphragm by compressor oils, debris in the air stream, or drying out of the regulator diaphragm over long periods of inactivity. If the regulator diaphragm cracks, your regulator will leak all the time.

The regulator gauge is cheap as well, and over time the innards corrode, or an impact might shatter the gauge-face cover.

Industrial air compressor regulators typically have a good supply chain of spare parts. They are expensive enough to warrant dismantling and repairing rather than tossing them out.

The typical DIY compressor air regulator does not enjoy a good supply of parts. With the price of a new regulator being in the $20 – $30 range, it’s hard to justify buying a kit (if you can find one) for almost that amount of money and spending a couple of hours tearing the regulator down and trying to get it working again.

In other words, the low end regulators are basically disposable when they fail.

You can  replace the gauge on a regulator for around $7 – $10, however. If it’s the gauge that goes, do get a replacement.

If the regulator starts to leak, sure, try to find a diaphragm for it and fix it if you can. For us, it’ll be time for a new compressor regulator at that point.

Since most replacement regulators come equipped with a display gauge, if the old gauge is still working, keep it for a spare.

Got a question about your air compressor regulator? Use the comment form below to ask it, and we’ll help if we can. If you see a question about air regulators here, add your comment if you can help. Only questions and comments about compressor regulators will be approved for this page.

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Amie M Manuel
Amie M Manuel
October 1, 2022 11:46 pm

Ok so I’m a new water plant operator in small plant my boss bought a new air pressure filter-regulator-lubrucator our old one says 140 psi the new one says 145psi and is bigger in size what difference will that make? Is there anyway this new one would be to big?

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Fraser
Fraser
March 11, 2022 10:32 am

Do all regulators have an inlet and outlet?

tom
tom
September 8, 2021 9:46 am

figured id add this. brand new 6 gallon craftsman pancake comp. the regulator knob does not alter regulated air pressure. it climbs along with tank pressure. all the way closed or open, and anywhere in between, doesnt regulate at all. they are sending me a brand new unit

Steven Smith
Steven Smith
August 3, 2021 3:35 pm

My Black Max compressor leaks air when it shuts off. The leak stops if I open the relief valve and close it. What is causing this problem. Thank you.

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Reply to  Steven Smith
August 4, 2021 8:56 pm

Offhand I’d say you need to check the tank check valve to be sure it seats tightly when the compressor pump stops.

Tommy
Tommy
March 21, 2021 7:48 pm

I have a new kobalt 8 gallon air compressor, how do I make my tank hood more air, it cuts off at 150, i welded an additional 2 feet of 10 inch round pipe to the existing tank after cutting hole in existing tank to transfer into the tank I welded on, I’m stil having same problem with it not filling up more , it’ gets very frustrating when u cannot use a air tool for more than 3 seconds , even with the addition tank on it , before it cuts on motor, please help me with this issue, I NEED MORE AIR TO GO INTO TANK AND NOT SHUT OFF AT 150,

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Reply to  Tommy
March 22, 2021 8:20 am

If I’ve found the correct compressor, the specs for it shows that the upper pressure is 150 PSI. I am sorry but you can’t increase that as the compressor motor and pump are not designed for outputting a higher pressure than that.

In terms of the small extra reservoir, that’s not a lot of additional air for running air tools.

Personally, I would not cut open a good tank and weld onto it. That has all sorts of safety issues. From the sound of it, you are skilled at welding, but I sure wouldn’t recommend that option for folks that don’t have a high skill in welding.

Despite what may be suggested to the contrary, this size of compressor tank and a 1.8 HP 120 Volt compressor motor and pump are best for the hobbyist wishing to drive the odd single-shot air nailer for example. They are not built for sustained, volume, air production.

In order to get more air you will need to acquire a larger HP motor on a larger air pump, and for continued running of tools, a much larger tank. Good luck.

Mike R
Mike R
February 21, 2021 9:55 am

I installed a new regulator on a craftsman 30 gal compressor and now it won’t show tank pressure until I increase the regulator pressure. Thanks for any help

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Reply to  Mike R
February 21, 2021 5:05 pm

Mike, a photo of the regulator and gauges would help. The tank gauge is to display tank pressure, and really has no impact on the regulator. The regulator displays the downstream air pressure setting.

So, you are saying that the air gauge that’s attached directly to the line from the tank displays nothing when the regulator displays nothing? I don’t see how that’s possible unless the tank pressure is zero PSI.

Two things. Please run the compressor to ensure that there is air in the tank and then look at the regulator housing to see if there is an arrow on it. If so, that arrow points to the coupler into which you plug the air line.

Did this help at all? Please comment. Thanks.

Bob
Bob
February 17, 2021 7:39 pm

My regulator was set at 90psi I walked back & heard air leaking & the regulator was now at 120psi

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Reply to  Bob
February 18, 2021 8:09 am

Your compressor has two gauges, Bob. One is the tank gauge and the other the regulator gauge. When you saw that the regulator gauge was now displaying 120 PSI, what was the pressure on the tank gauge, please?

What is the make/model of compressor, and what is the normal cut in and cut out?

Could you identify from where the leak was coming? Thanks.

Dan Bog
Dan Bog
February 8, 2021 6:01 pm

I’m presently using a Porter-Cable Model C2002 pancake compressor to run a hardwood floor stapling gun. My question is in regards to the recovery time of the regulator. The max tank pressure is set by the factory at 150psi, which it reaches easily. I have set the regulator at 75psi to fire the flooring stapler. I can get about 4-5 staples set before the regulator pressure drops below 60psi and the gun misfires. There is adequate pressure in the tank, over 120psi when this happens. If I wait for about 1-2 minutes the flooring gun will return to firing as the pressure shown on the regulator gauge returns to 70-75psi. Should the regulator recover more quickly than this? My research indicates that this compressor should work for the flooring I’m installing, but it’s only intermediately, which is frustrating. Do you believe this compressor is working as it should? I can’t find anything on the internet discussing regulator recovery. Thanks for your response.

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Reply to  Dan Bog
February 9, 2021 8:27 am

Dan, it’s my bet that the regulator is failing. The symptoms are common for that.

Dump all the air, screw out the regulator, and see what’s what.

Derek Painter
Derek Painter
February 1, 2021 7:20 pm

I have a D55146 4.5 gal. Electric compressor. As I was charging the compressor up, the guage upstream of the regulator blew the whole face off with tremendous force. The guage was still attached to the manifold, it only blew off the site glass and ring. I noticed a small leak originating from the guage prior to this. What could cause this? Thank you for your help

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Reply to  Derek Painter
February 2, 2021 7:46 am

Hey Derek. I don’t know how long you’ve had your DeWalt compressor, nor the conditions under which it was used.

Yet, this is not an inexpensive compressor, and it would be reasonable to think that the components on this model were top notch. Maybe so, maybe not. I suspect DeWalt “farms out” the manufacture of these compressors, likely to an Asian company, and that company may have substituted cheap parts. After all, the cost to make a simple air gauge in the orient is under $1.00.

I mentioned the age of the compressor and the conditions, as if used in high humid conditions, and left full of air, the moisture content in the the air, and in the tank, may be quite high. If the gauge is cheaply made it will quickly rust. If there is no visible evidence of this, then I doubt it’s been around long enough to rust out.

I expect in this case the regulator was either damaged by impact of some sort, or flawed in construction, and I would certainly contact DeWalt using this page to do so. Make sure you include your model number, and label the comment / complaint as a safety issue. DeWalt needs to know this happened.

One more thing, it’s always good to browse to see if there is a recall attached to an air compressor. I did a quick check and it does not appear as though DeWalt has recalled this model, so again, they need to hear about this.

Cheers, and please let us know how this unfolded with them if you contact them.

Norman Dallura
Norman Dallura
January 15, 2021 11:00 pm

I have a D27253 Air Compressor Regulator. It is installed with the arrow pointing in the direction of the air flow.

However, the pressure reading on the regulator gauge is the same as the tank pressure no matter how I have the control knob adjusted. The knob does control the flow, but the gauge does not change. The knob points toward me and the pressure gauge is on top. If I relocate the pressure gauge to the bottom of the regulator and put the plug on top, it reads the outlet pressure correctly as I rotate the control knob.

The problem is I have to position the regulator so the knob is in the back (pointing away from me) if I want the gauge on top. Not convenient but workable. Any issue in reversing the regulator so the arrow is pointing counter to the air flow so I can put the gauge on top and have the knob pointing toward me like it should? I read further down this thread that someone else has this problem. Is it possible the arrow is stamped pointing in the wrong direction?

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Reply to  Norman Dallura
January 16, 2021 6:39 pm

Hey Norman… just so I’ve got it clear, if the gauge is in one port it moves as you turn the regulator knob, but if the gauge is in another port on the same regulator, turning the regulator knob doesn’t change the gauge reading? If so, very weird.

I suppose you could replace the regulator as they aren’t a ton of money. Another option is to elbow the gauge into the port that works so that it suits.

As to the arrow, it is pointing towards the discharge coupling / ball valve on the right, yes?

Norman Dallura
Norman Dallura
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
January 16, 2021 7:30 pm

You are not the first to tell me this behavior is weird – I even went to a service center. The arrow is indeed pointed in the direction of the air flow. When I blow air through the inlet of the regulator, air only comes out of the top 1/8″ port (knob pointed toward me). When I blow air through the outlet of the regulator, air comes out only the bottom 1/8″ port. This forces me to have the pressure gauge on the bottom port. The original regulator had the same behavior. So, now two “D27253″ regulators have this behavior. Fro your comments and others, I understand that both 1/8” ports should be connected to the outlet, correct? Is there another generic regulator I can get that has both ports with the outlet pressure?

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Reply to  Norman Dallura
January 17, 2021 12:23 pm

Well sure. Just use your browser to search for small compressor air regulator and you’ll find lots. They aren’t expensive normally, and by changing out the one you are experiencing issues with will quickly prove what I surmise, and that is, the original regulator should have been a factory reject but got through somehow. Let us know what the result was. Thank you.

Dave
Dave
October 26, 2020 4:47 pm

I have a 21 gallon compressor with a 50ft hose reel and about 20ft of hose connecting the reel to the compressor. I need about 40psi to blow out my camper water lines. I never have lowered the regulator so I gave it a shot and brought it down to 40psi. I have a gauge that’s now reading outlet pressure (all valves closed and gauge connected to goes reel) and it reads 20psi. I cross-checked with a compression gauge and get around 18psi. No leaks in either. Should I bump up the pressure regulator on compressor until my gauges read 40 to truly get 40psi into my camper water lines? I want to blow out the lines to winterize but don’t want to harm any of the plumbing. I think I’m caught up on free flowing air (regulated) and the air my gauges read which should indicate total pressure in the lines. Any advice is appreciated!

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Reply to  Dave
October 26, 2020 6:34 pm

Sounds like pressure loss through the plumbing, Dave. Open the regulator at the compressor fully, and put another one just before the connector to the lines. Make sure that one’s set for the pressure you want. If you still can’t get the 40 PSI at the connector to the water lines, you’ll need to use a shorter or bigger air hose.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
October 26, 2020 7:49 pm

Thanks! I think the regulator isn’t accurate (cheap harbor freight compressor) so I guess my question is really if I need 40psi, should I assume hooking a gauge at the hose reel should result in 40psi showing on the gauge with no air moving? And if I relieve pressure, it should drop gauge to zero while relieving and when closed up reach 40psi on the gauge I have hooked up? Again, I think I’m thinking too far into this as I know long hose runs restrict output psi due to friction and I second guessed my entire setup when buying new air hoses the last time (I was looking for higher output for wizzy wheels and 3/4 impact guns)

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Reply to  Dave
October 27, 2020 7:15 am

I believe that if the output is static, that the pressure will stabilize all along the hose, and what goes in at the compressor regulator is what will be seen downstream all along the hose. That being said, as soon as you pull air, the pressure will drop at the outstream end, as it will take too long for the air to flow to meet the demand at the air end. When air stops flowing the pressure should again stabilize at the regulator setting.

The regulator shouldn’t drop to zero PSI in my opinion. Since the downstream hose is preventing high air flow, the regulator should react to the downstream pressure loss, but in my opinion shouldn’t drop to zero. That may an indication of a failing regulator.

luke
luke
October 25, 2020 2:41 am

My air compressor maxes out at 155 psi and i put a regulator that says in the specs that the max psi is 145. Is that referring to the maximum inlet psi or outlet psi? and is that a bad idea to have on there?

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Reply to  luke
October 25, 2020 11:14 am

So, your new regulator has an upper limit of 145 PSI and the compressor cuts out at 155 PSI? I suspect hitting a 145 PSI regulator with 155 PSI tank air won’t hurt it much, but if you need 155 PSI for the application, you won’t get it through that regulator.

As always, run the outlet pressure as low as the application requires for all sorts of good reasons, and you should be OK.

luke
luke
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
October 25, 2020 3:25 pm

sounds good. thanks

Joe
Joe
October 23, 2020 3:21 pm

My son took the regulator apart. Trying to find out which direction the part go back in. It’s a small Campbell Hausfeld twin tank. Has a spring and a round thing with a rubber gasket.

Looks like this.

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Thomas
Thomas
September 16, 2020 11:12 pm

Thanks for the great and educational content – greatly appreciated. I hope you can help me with the following problem:
My air filter regulator has a max rating of 150 psi. My 35 gallon tank is set for 140 psi cut out. For the past year I had the regulator set for 90 psi but would now like to increase it to 100 or 105 psi but I can’t get my regulator above 90 psi. I can turn it down to 60 psi but when I raise the pressure it won’t go past 85-90 psi. keep turning the knob 6-8 turns does not change anything. When turning it back down it takes 6-8 turns before the pressure starts to drops. It makes no difference if my tank reads 120 or 140 psi. Checked the diaphragm but all looks good. No leaks. It’s 2 years old. Any suggestions ??

Thanks in advance.
Thomas

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Reply to  Thomas
September 17, 2020 8:58 am

Regulators, by and large, are cheap (a buck or two in China) and as such they rust inside. I suspect yours has guts that are rusted to a stop. They aren’t expensive, so if this were mine, I’d simply replace the regulator. Hope this helps. Let us know if that solved the problem if you would. And we appreciate the kind comment.

Thomas
Thomas
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
September 18, 2020 12:58 am

Thanks for the quick response.
Took the regulator apart again- completely this time and cleaned everything, though there was no obvious rust or debris that I could find. Used compressed air in a can to clean all the holes and passageways. Assembled with a little plumbers valve grease on the o-rings, hooked up and now I can regulate up to the tank pressure again, just like it’s supposed to.
Thanks again for your help and suggestions.

Cheers

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Reply to  Thomas
September 18, 2020 7:54 am

You are welcome. You are more industrious than I. Good on you. And “cheers” back.

CHARLIE
CHARLIE
August 28, 2020 7:38 pm

I have a small twin tank unit that has a broken regulator. I took it off and use it without the regulator. It shuts off at 110 psi and starts up at 85 psi . The regulator would not allow more then 90 – 100 psi .
It it SAFE to use it with out the regulator?

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Reply to  CHARLIE
August 28, 2020 8:11 pm

Charlie, the regulator has nothing to do with the compressor start, run time, high pressure low pressure cut off. The regulators only job is to lower the tank air pressure to the most acceptable and minimum operating pressure of the air tool. Assuming what I mean by a regulator and what you mean by a regulator are the same item, there is no issue with using air directly from the tank to the air tool without a regulator in the middle, except that you may be using far more air than necessary for what you are doing, and if the air pressure you are using is higher than acceptable for the air tool.

If your compressor shuts off at 110 PSI, and the regulator wouldn’t allow you to set the downstream pressure higher than the 100 PSI you say, then it’s the wrong regulator or the regulator is broken. Hope this helps. Cheers.

Keith Phillips
Keith Phillips
July 12, 2020 10:36 am

there is an arrow on the bottom of my regulator( Porter Cable), should this face into the tanks or towards the air hose outlet?

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Reply to  Keith Phillips
July 12, 2020 12:47 pm

Towards the air outlet… the coupler on the compressor into which you plug your air line that sends air to the air tool.

Jeremy Vaughan
Jeremy Vaughan
April 24, 2020 8:38 pm

I’ve recently bought an air compressor (Dewalt) and the manifold assembly was leaking air badly. So I shopped around and couldn’t find the manifold I needed. So I bought one from ridgid which fits my lines and has the same set up as my Dewalt one (same amount of connectors and regulator) but the tank valve goes up to 250 and the compressor says it’s good for maximum of 200 psi. Can I still use the valve and regular assembly. Or with it being a 250 psi valve will it not stop filling up and damage my compressor?

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Reply to  Jeremy Vaughan
April 24, 2020 9:18 pm

Jeremy, when you say the “tank valve” are you talking about the regulator gauge face plate, or are you talking about the pressure switch. I’m thinking you are talking about the regulator gauge face plate and if you are, then no worries. You could put a regulator on there good for 10,000 PSI, and all that would result is you wouldn’t be able to read small pressure increments. If the pressure switch is part of the new assembly, and it’s a 250 PSI switch, and your compressor is good for 200 PSI only, then yes, you have a safety issue.

Dale
Dale
March 13, 2020 2:56 pm

I have a 21 CFM 80 gallon compressor. The regulator has to be readjusted to maintain set pressure even when using very small amount of air.

If I put a blow valve with an 1/8 in hole in nozzle on the hose and open it up the pressure gauge on regulator will drop from 140 psi to 100 psi and then maintain pressure at 100.

The tank outlet is 1/2 into a 1/2 ball valve shutoff into 4 inch long 1/2 inch pipe to 3/4 in inlet on regulator then out through water separator then hose.

While blowing air I can readjust regulator to a higher pressure and it will maintain that pressure however when I stop blowing the regulator gauge goes up to tank pressure. If I open the regulator to full open I only get a 1 or 2 psi drop when opening the blow valve. It seems as though the regulator really isn’t regulating very well. It is a new regulator that cost about $55 so not a supper cheapy but certainly not the best. I bought the 3/4 in regulator to make sure it could flow lots of cfm and would not be a restriction. Do you think the regulator is defective.
Thanks

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Reply to  Dale
March 13, 2020 4:02 pm

A 1/8″ hole can flow an awful lot of air.

If the pressure regulator is set, for example, at 80 PSI, as long as the tank pressure is higher than that 80 PSI, the output should remain at 80 PSI. If the pressure in the tank drops below 80 PSI due to air use, then the regulator pressure will drop to match the lower pressure in the tank.

The regulated pressure, if set for 80 PSI for example, should never rise when the compressor stops.

You just changed the regulator, yes? Please look at it and make sure the arrow on the head is pointed towards the discharge coupling, OK?

Mike
Mike
February 8, 2020 1:40 am

I have an older sanborn powermate with the square dial type regulator. It leaks when the tank pressure is above the line pressure. If I dial the regulator to tank pressure or above it doesn’t leak. When I dial below it blows off the air to equalize but continues to hiss slightly. When dialed up a notch it quits but within seconds it equalizes the line pressure and leaks. It will slowly leak until the tank pressure is 0 if the regulator is all the way down. Any ideas?

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Reply to  Mike
February 8, 2020 11:26 am

First, check the tank check valve to be sure it doesn’t leak. If it doesn’t, then replace the regulator, or dismantle it and try to find parts for it. I suspect a cracked diaphragm.

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
February 8, 2020 12:46 pm

Appreciate the reply. Now I suspected that also and may be wrong but in my thinking wouldnt the diaphragm being cracked make it leak even if it’s turned up to tank pressure?

If it helps it has this regulator. Then it also has the spring and handle obviously.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Mike
February 8, 2020 2:44 pm

Sometimes diaphragms have a threshold pressure that opens the crack but at lower pressure it doesn’t.

Once the downstream pressure stabilizes after bleeding air from the regulator, if air continues to leak, it’s most likely the tank check valve to check first.

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
February 9, 2020 6:29 pm

Thanks again.. I went to test the valve and I’m assuming it’s built in the tree here.. I can blow into it but cannot suck air out. If that is the problem any ideas in where to find a replacement? I can’t seem to find anything with one built in like that.. or would it be better to just re-plumb the whole thing with a new valve?

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Reply to  Mike
February 9, 2020 6:35 pm

Not quite sure by the direction when you say you can “blow in”, but if you are saying that, from the tank end, if you blow into the check valve, and air flows through the valve and back out, then yes, the tank check valve isn’t working. Can you clean it and test again?

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
February 9, 2020 6:43 pm

The bottom of the tree there with the circle and crescent holes.. I can blow into that and air will leak out of the other ports. I can try to clean but I’ve just never seen a check valve built into the tree like that and can’t really get into anything.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Mike
February 10, 2020 11:02 am

Mike, bottom line is, if you cannot do a quick fix, you may have to try and find a replacement. I’ve reviewed this thread and can’t see (hope I haven’t missed it) where you identify the model of Sanborn Powermate you have. There are parts available, but searching for them is difficult without knowing the model. Using the model number as part of the string, search for replacement regulator for Sanborn Powermate compressor model xxxxx, where the x’s are your model number.

Ron
Ron
January 11, 2020 10:40 am

Sir – My Craftsman air compressor regulator knob suddenly would not turn. I replaced the regulator and it still does not turn. I can’t figure out why or what to do. Please help!

Respectfully,

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Reply to  Ron
January 13, 2020 8:43 am

Odd that you replaced the regulator and the new one doesn’t work as well. Have you tried pushing down on, or lifting up the regulator adjustment knob before trying to turn it?

Ron
Ron
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
January 13, 2020 4:24 pm

Yes sir. I have not had any issues with this compressor at all. The regulator pulls out but does not turn at all.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Ron
January 13, 2020 9:36 pm

Hi Ron. It doesn’t make any sense that a problem with an older regulator would “migrate” to a newer one. That sure puzzles me.

You cannot turn the knob at all, in either direction, on the new regulator and after pulling out and pushing in on the regulator knob?

Just curious. Perhaps you could tell us what the pressure reading is on the tank gauge while you are attempting to lower the pressure to what you want for your air tool on the regulator? Thanks.

Pat R.
Pat R.
January 9, 2020 4:34 pm

Hi, WillyR!

Tons of great info here…thank you so much for it!

I have a small Bostich air compressor and with your help here I diagnosed it as a bad regulator. I ordered a replacement and after about 6 weeks it finally arrived. I hope I don’t have to go through that again…..

Anyway, my one question is this….. I did notice when taking the pressure gauges off the defective regulator, Bostich had used some sort of sealant on the threads which I removed with a brass wire brush. Not having any sealant, I used about 3 wraps of Teflon tape on each connection. So far, the tank holds air for about 2 hours before recycling (when the regulator was bad, it would recycle 4-5 times just topping of my wife’s tires 🙂

Do I need to remove the Teflon tape and place some sealant on all the threads or should I just keep on keeping on?

TIA, WIllyR!

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Reply to  Pat R.
January 13, 2020 8:44 am

Does your Bostitch air compressor have a tank check valve where the line from the pump head enters the tank? If so, I suspect that your tank check valve is what’s leaking. Please check and advise.

John Stevenson
John Stevenson
November 27, 2019 7:53 pm

Hi, great article! I have a porter cable cmb15 that the main tank goes to 150 psi. The problem is that it will only go to 150 if I have the regulator set to max. Otherwise it follows the regulator. If I set the regulator to 100 then the main goes to 100 and it keeps running while it bleeds off the air somewhere. Is it the regulator that is the problem?

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Reply to  John Stevenson
November 28, 2019 8:46 am

Thanks for your kind comment.

As to the regulator, it has nothing to do where the compressor starts and stops, that’s the pressure switch job.

That the compressor runs and runs when the pressure regulator is set to 100, and gets to 150 PSI when the regulator is set there certainly suggests an issue with a leak at the regulator.

You don’t indicate what the normal cut out pressure of your compressor is, so I don’t know if the compressor continues to run at 150 PSI, or shuts itself off? If it shuts itself off at 150 PSI and doesn’t lose air at that point makes me wonder. Have you change regulators? If so, please ensure that the regulator has been installed with the arrow on the head (hoping yours has one) pointing towards the discharge coupler.

Please advise.

Tim
Tim
November 17, 2019 9:41 pm

My regulator seems to work ok, but the pressure gauge does not drop when dialing down air pressure. I installed a new gauge but have the same problem. It reads tank pressure but but doesn’t drop when output pressure is dropped.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Tim
November 17, 2019 9:51 pm

Tim, your compressor has two gauges, yes? Is the one reading tank pressure showing a higher pressure than the pressure you want downstream to your air tools? And, are you saying that with, for example, 100 PSI in the tank, if you dial the regulator down to 50 PSI, the regulator gauge doesn’t move to reflect that lower downstream pressure?

Was the regulator working before? Have you pulled up on, or pushed down, on the adjustment knob to be sure that’s its connected inside? Please advise.

David
David
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 23, 2020 1:20 am

I have the same issue as Tim. I have a Craftsman 919.167780. It’s rarely used but old. It has a tank pressure gauge and an outlet pressure gauge. The regulator doesn’t reduce pressure below tank pressure. The original regulator became leaky and hard to adjust. I cleaned it with some small improvement but I recently replaced the regulator with a new one. I experience the same issue with the new regulator as I did with the old regulator. The outlet pressure follows the tank pressure. The tank pressure behaves as expected. The compressor starts and stops at the appropriate tank pressures. The new regulator is part number D27253. Any suggestions?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  David
July 23, 2020 10:23 am

I suspect that the new regulator is installed backwards. There should be an arrow on the body or head of the regulator. That arrow should point to the discharge coupler of the compressor, not towards the tank. Is it? Thanks.

David Salvador
David Salvador
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 31, 2020 9:41 am

Yes. I had a hard time finding the arrow. It was actually a triangle. I initially assumed that since the regulator would only fit one way and was supposedly specifically spec’ed for my compressor it would be correct. I had to swap a plug and the gauge on opposite sides of the regulator body to keep the gauge oriented correctly with the flow in the correct direction.
Thanks for your efforts on this website. It is a great resource.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  David Salvador
July 31, 2020 10:13 am

You are welcome. Thanks for the comment.

Scott
Scott
October 23, 2019 2:21 pm

I have a Bostitch CWC 200ST that has the same regulator pictured by Andy back in July.

The knob on mine is stripped out and needs to be replaced. But can’t figure out how to disassemble the regulator to take the knob off so I can insert it into the panel. It has a hex piece of metal on the end of the knob screw that prevents the knob from coming all the way off. Hoping there’s a way that doesn’t involve destroying that retaining nut. Thanks in advance.

Savoy air compressor.png
Scott
Scott
Reply to  Scott
October 23, 2019 2:26 pm

OK, mine is a little different.

regulator knob.png
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Reply to  Scott
October 23, 2019 3:01 pm

If the photo of the compressor is of your compressor Scott, you’ll want to remove the metal cover of the whole assembly to get a look at how the regulator connects in. These regulators are cheap, costing a few cents to manufacture in an Asian country, and sell retail in North America for, typically, under $10. However, if the regulator is part of the manifold under the metal plate, you likely won’t find another to match. Pull the metal cover off and then add a photo of the under-plumbing if you would.

My thought is that you’ll be replace the regulator rather than being successful in finding parts for yours.

Scott
Scott
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
October 23, 2019 5:58 pm

thanks willyr. Yes that’s a pic of my compressor. As you can see from the pics attached the black cap has to come off so you can unscrew the red ring and insert it onto the panel.

The little hex piece of metal is what stops the knob from coming all the way out.

regulator panel.jpg
regulator panel (side angle).jpg
regulator fully in.jpg
regulator fully out stopped.jpg
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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Scott
October 23, 2019 8:34 pm

Thanks for the pics, Scott. As I thought, it is a cast manifold, but it looks like you are in luck, and that is, the regulator threads onto the pipe in behind the metal face plate. Done some damage to the knob in trying to get that off, looks like too. Yet I’m a bit puzzled, as your first pic looks like the regulator has been disassembled. Is that not so, or is that the old regulator?

Scott
Scott
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
October 23, 2019 8:49 pm

Sorry, forgot to identify the pics. The two on the red desk are of the disassembled new replacement regulator. The two on the workbench show the old one on the panel.

The first pic is of the new disassembled regulator fully unscrewed but held into the housing by that hex piece of metal pinned onto the screw thats connected to the knob. The second pic is just that new part screwed fully in so you can see the screw & hex bit.

I think I can reuse the old black base and just screw the new silver part onto the old black base. Figured that made sense since it’s already all connected up. So in essence my issue is getting the new black regulator knob OFF the new assembly so I can insert the new sliver part into the hole of the plate and replace the black knob and screw it all onto the old black base.

Hope that makes more sense.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Scott
October 24, 2019 7:48 am

Scott, not much wisdom I’m afraid. I believe the regulator handle / knob is typically attached with a snap ring, and, a sharp pull upwards (with gloves on) should remove the handle. I take it you’ve tried this already?

Keith Raulston
Keith Raulston
September 22, 2019 10:54 pm

I have a new Husky oil free 8-gallon air compressor I purchased this year. I either have a [ outlet / downstream ] regulator malfunction, or I need to be educated on the normal operation of the regulator gage on the compressor. The compressor has 2 gages: one shows me the tank pressure and it is preset by manufacturer to shut the compressor off at 150psi, which it does properly. ( And when tank pressure drops to its preset low point, the compressor kicks back on and builds pressure back up to 150psi.)
My issue and question is concerning the outlet / downstream tool pressure regulator valve/gage. I have a stapler that recommends a minimum of 60psi and the max is 90psi. So I adjusted the regulator knob clockwise or counterclockwise to where the output regulator pressure reads 75psi. My confusion is: when i use the stapler tool, the tank pressure starts to drop from 150psi as expected, but the output regulator pressure also starts to drop well below the tools recommended minimum pressure of 60psi. The tank pressure is still above 110psi, which confuses me. Is the output pressure not supposed to hold at my 75psi setting? Or is it supposed to drop down with tank pressure? ( I thought that as long as the tank pressure was above 75psi, then the output regulator pressure setting should remain at 75psi. ) Please educate me on what is happening. Thank you.

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Reply to  Keith Raulston
September 23, 2019 10:23 am

Keith, the upstream (tank) gauge does not control anything. It reveals the tank pressure, reflecting the pressure changes in the tank. It’s the pressure switch that determines when the compressor goes on and off. Just want to make that clear.

The downstream gauge is on the outlet regulator. As long as that regulator is set at a pressure that is below the tank pressure, it will maintain the pressure of the air stream out the coupler to the air tool.

Having said that, if the air tool in use demands a lot of air, the gauge on the regulator will “blip” downwards for a second to display that the pressure has dropped due to air demand exceeding the regulator response time, but that should only be a very short blip. If the pressure displayed on the regulator gauge drops when the tool is used, and that pressure stays down for seconds, and the tank gauge is registering a higher pressure available than that what is being sued, then either the air tool is drawing way more air than can flow through the regulator, or more likely, the regulator itself is malfunctioning. A stapler typically will not draw air for more than a split second, so my thought is your regulator itself is the problem.

LoneRider
LoneRider
August 17, 2019 5:50 am

I have AS18-2 air compressor. When I try to turn the valve for adjusting the air, it turns slowly in both ways and it feels like it’s been tight and the pressure is always on same level. Can please tell me if there is any way to fix this issue or do I have to buy new pressure valve? Thx

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  LoneRider
August 17, 2019 8:35 am

The knob on the pressure regulator is supposed to turn in both directions, one way to dial up the pressure, the other to dial it down. Are you saying that regardless of which way you turn the knob, the reading on the regulator pressure gauge remains the same? Before chucking out the regulator and replacing it: 1) is the tank pressure gauge showing a reading that is higher in pressure that the setting on the regulator 2) with the tank pressure higher than what is displayed on the regulator, push up and / or push down on the regulator knob and see if doing so allows it to engage inside.

Anything?

LoneRider
LoneRider
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
August 18, 2019 5:02 am

Sorry that it took me so long to answer you back. There is only one pressure gauge, that is on the regulator. I’ll send you pics of it. When I turn it on, with my ab gun connected, the BARS are by spec(3-3.5), but when I push on ab gun, it goes to 10ps. If I pull the gauge up and try to turn it left or right, it turns very hard and clicks every few turns, like it’s tight.

20190818_105043.jpg
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Reply to  LoneRider
August 19, 2019 9:06 am

And I didn’t pick up the fact that yours is an air brush compressor. One gauge is normal. This compressor has no tank, and runs on demand. In other words it compresses air as the air is being used and stops when the air stops being used… right?

If you are saying that when you start using air the regulator gauge moves up to 150 PSI (10 Bars) from 50 PSI or so (3 – 3.5 Bars), happening on it’s own before you had adjusted the regulator then I would say that the regulator is has failed.

Theo
Theo
July 28, 2019 4:20 pm

I installed a regulator on a 2-gallon portable air tank. Can I also use the regulator to fill the tank or will air flow opposite the direction intended damage the regulator?

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Reply to  Theo
July 29, 2019 10:03 am

Theo, when you say “using the regulator to fill the tank” I take that to mean that you wish to supply air to the tank by flowing air back through the regulator and into the tank? No, I wouldn’t do that. The regulator is designed to flow air one way, trying to flow air back through it could result in damage to the regulator, and will certainly result in air blowing out of the relief port on the regulator.

I’d dump all the air, and install a tee and an coupler upstream from the regulator, and use a connect on the supply air line to add air to the tank that way, if there is not other option.

Chad
Chad
July 11, 2019 1:12 am

I put a new regulator/moisture trap on my compressor. It builds pressure in the tank fine as long as the regulator is at 0. As soon as I go to adjust it to correct psi, it dumps all the air out of tank. Nothing reading on tank or regulator valve and won’t build pressure again until regulator is back to 0……help

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Reply to  Chad
July 11, 2019 8:52 am

Chad, is there an arrow on the body of the filter/regulator somewhere? It sounds as though they are installed backwards. Make sure that the filter is first and then the regulator, and if both in one body, ensure that the arrow on the body of the regulator (or somewhere on it usually) is pointing at the discharge coupler, not at the tank.

Chad
Chad
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 15, 2019 4:00 pm

Ok, found out that the airbrush hose had several pinholes in it, but being braided cloth over it….it was harder to hear. I bought a new airhose and it holds pressure now. The flow arrow is in the right drection but now tank won’t build pressure past whatever setting I set on the regulator. For example….if I set to 20….tank only builds to 20…..if I set to 80…it builds to 80. This makes the compressor run full cycle. Bad regulator?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Chad
July 15, 2019 4:29 pm

Chad, typically the air regulator has nothing to do with the cycle of the compressor. That’s the pressure switch’s job, and normally changing the regulator setting will have no impact on that.

Having said that, before we go further, what’s the make and model of the air compressor, please. You mentioned airbrush hose, and if it’s an airbrush air compressor, and it’s a demand compressor, meaning that it comes on when the air is used and is possibly tankless, that will make a difference.

Chad
Chad
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 16, 2019 6:15 pm

It is an airbrush compressor. Sil-Air 15a. I can hear air leaking out of the top of the regulator even though it’s new. It has a 1 Liter. tank but I will only be running at around 20-25 psi. I don’t believe it should run full cycle all the time or that would defeat the purpose of a tank. It is almost like whatever psi the regulator is set to, if it exceeds that then it comes out of the top of the regulator instead of building pressure in the tank.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Chad
July 16, 2019 6:40 pm

The regulator is a “relieving” type, meaning that if the downstream air pressure is higher than the regulator setting, then the higher pressure from downstream will vent out the top of the regulator.

If you disconnect the air line, and air is still venting out of the top of the regulator, then that suggests that the regulator diaphragm is compromised, and air is leaking through it and out the vent hole.

If the latter and the compressor is under warranty, I’d return it for a replacement. If not under warranty, if it’s a Filter/Regulator combination unit, you should be able to acquire one for around $13,00 or so in E-bay, or $30 from an on line outlet. Google “buy mini-filter regulator is yours is a integrated one, or just mini-regulator if it’s just the regulator, and that will cost you less I would expect.

Andy
Andy
July 9, 2019 5:55 pm

I have a 21 gal Central Pneumatic compressor from HF that was given to me by a friend. It will successfully fill to 125 PSI and cut off.

I had a ball valve between the regulator and the quick connect for the hose. When I would connect the hose with just a simple air gun attached and open the ball valve the pressure on the regulator would drop from 90 PSI to zero.

The motor would cut back on and the regulator would fill back up.

Often, the safety valve would trigger with the tank around 120 psi.

When the regulator was back up to 90 PSI, I would try to use the tool and it would blow air for a couple of seconds and the regulator pressure drops back to zero. Motor cuts back in to refill.

I’ve replaced the regulator and remove the ball valve. Replaced the quick connect with a new one. All are 1/4″ NPT fittings.

I’ve ordered a new safety valve thinking that something may be up with it but I doubt it. Any ideas? I can replace the pressure switch and maybe the check valve. But, by that time, I probably should have just bought a new compressor.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Andy
July 9, 2019 7:28 pm

Oh Andy, you are having fun, aren’t you with your interesting – and expensive – series of compressor issues. So sorry you’re having these issues.

Unless the ball valve was not opening when you opened it all the way, then having it in the circuit between the regulator and the discharge coupler (into which you plug the connector on the air line) should not have affected the air flow at all. So that should have been a none issue.

You say ” It will successfully fill to 125 PSI and cut off.” is this from an empty tank, or from a tank with the PSI of the cut in pressure level of the pressure switch in it?

” the regulator would drop from 90 PSI to zero.” If there is nothing in the air line between the tank and the regulator then this regulator is failing. You do need to be sure that the regulator is getting full, unobstructed flow from the tank.

“Often, the safety valve would trigger with the tank around 120 psi.”. If the PRV is rated for 140 PSI or so, the typical pressure level a 125 PSI cut out air compressor would have the PRV set for, then the PRV is gunked up or failing. That needs to be cleaned and checked or replaced, for sure.

“it would blow air for a couple of seconds and the regulator pressure drops back to zero” that, too, is a symptom of a failing regulator.

“regulator pressure drops back to zero. Motor cuts back in to refill.” This is weird. If you start with a full charge of air in the tank, a 21 gallon tank should blow air for a while before the pressure drops to cut in and the motor starts. If this is happening after two seconds either you don’t have a full charge of air in the tank or the blow gun, which do consume a ton of compressed air, is using a lot more than you think.

The tank pressure is monitored by the pressure switch. The regulator simply reduces the flow and pressure of air downstream from it, and there is no other connection than that. That the regulator drops to zero either means that the tank is empty or the regulator is pooched.

Lots of things to check, please keep us posted. Good luck.

Andy
Andy
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 10, 2019 11:42 pm

So, I took off everything off past the pressure switch. So, no regulator or connect. In theory, if I turned it on then, it should be dumping air straight out. When I turned it on, it filled the tank and hardly anything came out.

So, I’m suspecting it’s either the pressure switch or the actual attachment to the tank. I removed the pressure switch after disconnecting everything. It looked clean and clear. There was some gunk on the hole coming from the tank. But seemed clear on enough. I tried inserting a wire into the tank hole to see if it was clear. Couldn’t get all the way in. So, either the tank is clogged or it’s not a straight shot.

Not sure here.

28898493-3F14-4949-B8D4-C44C1BA354C1.jpeg
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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Andy
July 11, 2019 8:51 am

If you took off the pressure switch there is nothing between the end of the pipe and the tank, and I guess the tank is empty of pressure yes? The motor wires must now be exposed, and you could run a wire to each from a power cord to start the compressor if you are comfortable and safe doing so. If you do, what happens? Does air blow out the nipple from the tank?

Andy
Andy
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 11, 2019 10:06 pm

I did as you suggested and got just a trickle of air coming from the nipple. In fact the tank filled. I cut it off at 100 psi and could hear a small amount of air exiting but that was it. So, I guess this means the tank nipple is clogged.

I used a little usb endoscope camera I had to look inside the tank. Overall, looks ok but I couldn’t see the exit area around the base of the nipple. Not really sure how to clean this.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Andy
July 12, 2019 8:52 am

Been messing with compressors for a lot of years and have never run into this. Do you know if the compressor was ever turned over? If the tank hadn’t been drained regularly, and if the compressor turned over, it is possible sludge from the tank got into the nipple.

What to do? With the tank drain open, and if you have access to another compressor or a tank with air, blow air into the nipple to try and dislodge whatever is in there? Or, extreme, but maybe carefully pour a little boiling water into the nipple to try and dissolve sludge if that’s what’s doing it? If you opt for the latter, make sure to drain the tank frequently over the next little while to get all the water out.

And last… anyone else have any ideas on this one for Andy?

Andy
Andy
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 18, 2019 10:16 pm

Ok. I stuck a large nail into the hole and gave it a light rap with a hammer. Whatever was stuck finally came loose and air is now flowing properly. What a pain. Anyway, thanks for the help. I now know how a compressor works. 🙂

Andy
Andy
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 9, 2019 10:45 pm

Thanks for your detailed reply.

I doubt there was an issue with the ball valve but I took it out of the equation anyway. I do believe there was a slight leak involving the ball valve and/or coupler (or the joints).

The tank has a pressure gauge on it directly (not part of the pressure switch. From empty, the compressor will fill the tank to 125 psi and cut off. It will cut back on when it drops to some number (didn’t pay close enough attention). but I think it’s supposed to be 90 psi.

I don’t think there is an obstruction between the pressure cut off switch and the regulator. Maybe I put it in wrong? I presume the arrows point in the flow of the air. So, I think it’s correct. I bought a new one from the hardware store (HD – Husky brand). Seems very similar to the one I replaced.

I’ve used the hose and the air gun with my 6 gal compressor no problems. It’s a simple pistol grip blow gun. It shouldn’t be taking a ton of air. So, I agree, this should blow strongly for quite a while before the compressor kicks in.

Could it possibly be the check valve? I don’t know.

The PRV is 125 psi which seems strange for this compressor which is 125 psi. I bought a new 125 psi PRV but maybe I should get 140 psi?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Andy
July 10, 2019 9:43 am

If I understand your comment correctly, the regulator arrow points to the discharge coupler? If so, that is correct.

No, the PRV cracking pressure should not be 125 PSI if the cut out pressure is 125 PSI. Either replace the PRV or if you can adjust the cut out pressure down by 5-10 PSI on the pressure switch, that should resolve that issue.

If the tank check valve were leaking air would be flowing out of the unloader valve all the time the compressor was off, and the tank would empty.

If the blow gun isn’t using 35 PSI of tank air in 2 seconds, and I doubt it is, what I then cannot understand is why the tank pressure drops so fast and low enough to kick on the compressor to refill the tank to 125 PSI. If there is no massive air leak and the tank pressure is really not dropping to cut in but the compressor is kicking on anyway the pressure switch isn’t working or wired correctly in my opinion.

Curtis
Curtis
June 26, 2019 2:52 pm

I just purchased a cheap Craftsman 2.6 scfm with a 6 gallon pancake tank (CMEC6150
). My intent is to use this to fill tires, and some small tools. However, in the event I need to use my Ingersoll Rand professional impact wrench to take off a lug nut, I’m expecting to get 3 maybe 4 sec’s on 90 PSI air. Would I likely need to replace the factory air regulator on this small air compressor to get a sufficient flow because of the small rating of the compressor? Great thread and thank you.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Curtis
June 26, 2019 4:08 pm

Probably not, Curtis. The impediment will be the small size of the pump and tank. You won’t be happy with the use time of the 1/2″ impact wrench, but it should work OK for a bit.

Scott
Scott
June 10, 2019 9:33 pm

I have a hitachi 6 gallon EC510 compressor. Everything runs fine, including the regulator as far as adjusting the pressure to what I need. The problem Im getting is after shooting a few nails. Whether 1 1/4 roofers or 12d framing nails at 100 lbs or so, after the first 2 or 3 nails (shot within 2-5 seconds of eachother) the following nails set less and less until I wait 5-10 seconds to shoot again. Seemingly from the regulator not recovering nearly as quickly as it used to or as I need it to. The discharge of air seems sluggish. What could be causing this? The regulator on this compressor from what I’ve gathered is part of a manifold which costs $111 dollars and ships within weeks from the one supplier I quickly checked. That may not be in my best interest to replace, for obvious reasons and especially since Im not sure what the problem may be exactly. Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated!

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Scott
June 11, 2019 7:17 am

Sure sounds like the regulator is the problem, and that you have to buy a manifold to get a regulator sure seems unfair, and particularly when the manifold price you refer to is just under 1/2 the price of a new EC5 compressor. You may have to make your own manifold using off-the-shelf brass fittings from a decent hardware store, find a used EC to cannibalize for parts, or, bite the bullet and buy a new manifold. First though, if you believe the regulator is failing too, then why not take it apart to see if you can spot the problem?

Scott
Scott
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
June 11, 2019 8:06 am

I was afraid of that. And yes it almost seems silly to pay that much for a part when I could have a brand new compressor for not a whole lot more. Could it possibly have anything to do with the pressure gauge attached to the regulator or manifold rather? I had planned on taking it apart but figured I’d consult the experts first to possibly pinpoint the issue or find that it may be a different source. I will definitely do some exploring and see if I can salvage it. Thanks so much for the quick response.

Fix My Compressor Moderator
Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Scott
June 11, 2019 10:19 am

The pressure gauge is a “dumb” device, meaning it only displays the pressure that is reaching it. If it is showing a pressure drop, it’s because the pressure to it is dropping, so no, I don’t think it’s a bum gauge. But, dump all the air and swap the two gauges to determine if one of them is at fault. Otherwise, you’re likely stuck with the options noted in the previous post.

Tyler Lovell
Tyler Lovell
May 10, 2019 3:19 pm

I have a regulator that is making a trumpet like sound when air passes through it. What could cause this?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Tyler Lovell
May 10, 2019 5:27 pm

Likely the diaphragm inside the regulator has a crack, at least, that would be my first guess. Is it a new one, just installed? If so, check to be sure that it’s installed with the air flowing the right way.

Tyler Lovell
Tyler Lovell
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
May 13, 2019 8:52 am

Brand new 1/2″ 144scfm 150 psi regulator, it was in line just before a filter/condenser. I moved it back to the quick connect on the wall and that seemed to fix the issue. If it comes back I’ll have to assume the diaphragm is cracked. Thanks!

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Tyler Lovell
May 13, 2019 1:36 pm

Tyler, glad that resolved it so far. A thought though… are you familiar with the acronym FRL? It stands for Filter, Regulator & Lubricator. They are in that order in purpose as putting the regulator before the filter does not stop water and any other airborne debris from the tank from interfering with / fouling the regulator innards. That’s why it’s suggested that the filter always get installed first. Crud in the regulator might have accounted for the noise and by moving the regulator you may have dislodged whatever it was that was making the racket.

Tyler Lovell
Tyler Lovell
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
May 13, 2019 2:12 pm

Yes I am familiar with FRL’s but good to know! The regulator is for a piece of equipment that has the inlet on the filter, I didnt want to tear apart the equipment to get things in a logical order. We do have an FRL system for the air supply before the regulator. Cant rule out dirt but also seems the filter was impeding airflow. Thanks for the help.

Joris Freddy
Joris Freddy
April 27, 2019 9:13 am

Hi All,
please I’m so confuised I have big problem with the quincy Compressor air.
the regulation are fail what can I do to reasolv this problem?
normaly it’s will be regulate between 5 to 10 barg to load and upload

Fix My Compressor Moderator
Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Joris Freddy
April 27, 2019 2:04 pm

Joris, if it’s a regulator on a Quincy compressor I’d like to move this thread to the Quincy page, assuming you can tell us what the model number of your Quincy is, and upload a photo or two of it. Also, what does it mean to you that the regulator fails? Is it that the downstream pressure is wrong… what exactly?

Alan
Alan
April 25, 2019 1:17 am

I have a quick question that I’m hoping can be answered before tomorrow morning for school. My question is if a gauge is manufactured to have the ability to read out from 0 to 100psi, why would someone want to re-range it to read only 10 to 70psi?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Alan
April 25, 2019 9:06 am

Not sure what you mean by re-range it Alan. However, a regulator gauge range of 10-70 PSI should give more accurate pressure readings, assuming the regulator and regulator gauge isn’t a piece of junk. General purpose regulators may show a pressure that could be 3 +/- PSI off from true, while a precision regulator might be only .25 PSI off from actual. The use of a precision regulator with a small pressure range would allow the user to dial in the pressure to the device using air, and some require precise pressure, more accurately.

Brandon
Brandon
April 24, 2019 10:33 am

Hello, can you explain to me the difference in ratings of compressed air regulators? I have a very inexpensive regulator filter combo that I want to put on my 60 gallon 175psi max air compressor. The regulator is rated for 80scfm @ 100psi and says that the max pressure is 145psi. My question is, does the 145psi max mean that the regulator is only meant to regulate pressure as high as 145psi and anything above will not be accurately regulated, or if I connect this regulator to 175psi I am going to break my regulator?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Brandon
April 24, 2019 11:24 am

Hey Brandon. If a regulator is rated for 145 PSI, then that’s the highest pressure it is designed to handle and it will not register pressure above that level. In other words, if you flow 175 PSI into it, the regulator can only regulate up to 145 PSI.

Will 175 PSI damage a regulator rated for 145 PSI? I would expect so, but it may not. Nevertheless, prudence would suggest that you replace the 145 PSI regulator with one rated for at least 175 PSI if not 200 PSI, and take the guesswork out of it. Hope this helps.

Alan
Alan
April 7, 2019 8:17 pm

Hi folks – what happens if I install the regulator in the wrong direction? I recently took apart my regulator to reseal the component threads and realised that the regulator does not have an airflow direction marking. Can anyone tell from these photos which way I should reassemble it? Any help would be much appreciated!

IMG_20190408_112557.jpg
Regulator 1.jpg
Regulator 2.jpg
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Reply to  Alan
April 7, 2019 8:27 pm

If you install it with the flow going in the wrong direction, you will not get regulated air pressure at the air tool, and typically the regulator gauge reading will show the tank pressure instead of the pressure you have set the regulator for. Odd regulator this one. Not seen one with a coupler, fitting and two gauges before. What is the compressor it’s off of, please?

Alan
Alan
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
April 7, 2019 8:36 pm

Cheers Willyr – this is the compressor…

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Reply to  Alan
April 8, 2019 8:38 am

Thanks for the .pdf. That regulator appears to have a channel inside that allows full pressure tank air to get to the tank gauge, and then regulated air to be displayed on the regulator gauge and then allow that regulated air to flow to the discharge coupler to get to the air tool. While I’ve certainly not seen every regulator, in North America regulators (about $14 US on line) accept incoming full pressure air, display the regulated air pressure and then allow that regulated air pressure to flow to the coupler to the air line. Typically they do not have a port in the body of the regulator that displays the tank pressure.

If you are unable to get the old regulator to function properly, the only respite would be to acquire another with a flow indicator arrow on it. I just had a look at Amazon.UK and found a regulator that would do the job for you. It was the item #1 on this page: https://www.amazon.co.uk/slp/air-compressor-regulator/t8n6b42525dk5n5 . The connector on the left would be replaced by a “tee” into which you would plumb the tank pressure gauge, and then plumb the whole thing into the feed line from the tank. That would give you tank pressure, a functioning regulator, a regulator gauge, and a coupler into which you would plug the air hose.

Alan
Alan
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
April 8, 2019 4:27 pm

Cheers willyr! Yeah I figured replacing it might be a good option. Thanks so much for your help – very much appreciated!

Roy Vetsch
Roy Vetsch
March 26, 2019 6:00 pm

Where can I find a regulator #243for a lIl red air compressor model BAR233P?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Roy Vetsch
March 26, 2019 9:29 pm

Roy, I cannot find any information about a “red” air compressor BAR233P… none! Is “Red” the brand name, or model of a different brand name air compressor? Nor does the regulator part 243 return any information for a compressor, but it does return gas regulators? Perhaps you might post again with a photo or two of your compressor showing the old regulator if you still have it, or where on the compressor it would go if you had a replacement?

Jack Schrader
Jack Schrader
March 25, 2019 8:05 pm

Hi. I just got a new Husky air compressor. I am having trouble setting my regulator valve. I set it to a maximum of 90 psi, but my compressor keeps pumping up until I switch it off. Am I doing something wrong? Thanks in advance for any help. Jack

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Reply to  Jack Schrader
March 25, 2019 8:57 pm

Hello Jack. If I understand correctly, you may be laboring under an understanding that many new compressor owners do, and that is that the air regulator, the one you’ve set at 90 PSI, has something to do with turning the air compressor on and off. It does not.

It is the pressure switch that does that, and, depending on the model of Husky air compressor you have, that cut out, or compressor stopping pressure, may be 125 PSI or higher.

The regulator sets the pressure that the air tool at the other end of the air line gets from the tank, and normally the regulator pressure should be set as low as possible to allow the air tool to work properly. That saves air, energy cost, and wear and tear on the compressor.

Hope this helps… you might read the pages on the site about what the regulator does and the pressure switch does for more info.

Jack Schrader
Jack Schrader
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
March 29, 2019 10:20 pm

Hi. Yes Willy R., your information answered my question. Thanks very much. Regards, Jack Schrader

Jim
Jim
August 19, 2017 3:26 pm

I have an iwata compressor and the knob will not turn to allow air flow. The knob is in the up position, just will not turn. I have used it for about four years and the compressor was working fine a few days ago. The tank can still be drained from the water trap filter bleed. Can the regulator be replaced with a third party regulator. It’s the Iwata IS-900 model and replacement parts are over $100 while many third party regulators are under $20.

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Reply to  Jim
August 19, 2017 4:23 pm

Jim, if the compressor is off warranty, you can put any part on it you wish with no penalty from losing that warranty. And yes, if this were my Iwata, I sure would replace the Iwata combination F/r (filter regulator) with a non-oem one for a fraction of the cost. Make sure the element is the same micron rating and the pressure range of the new setup is close to the old.

SJS
SJS
July 20, 2017 10:09 am

Hello- I retrofitted a portable air tank and accidentally hooked up the air pressure regulator (0-15 PSI) backwards with the air flow arrow pointing toward the tank. and realized this when I filled the tank to roughly 50-65PSI and the air regulator gauge did not work properly. I switched the regulator around and it appears the gauge is still not working properly. It never drops to zero when the valve is completely closed and only starts increasing at around 8 PSI where the needle is stuck. It is an oil filled gauge and it dropped a little when tapping it but clearly it is not working properly. My question is would having hooked up the regulator backwards caused damage to the gauge or is it likely I received a bad gauge?

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Reply to  SJS
July 20, 2017 3:59 pm

Do I understand correctly that the original gauge is rated 0-15 PSI, and it received pressure above 50 PSI? I suspect, if that’s correct, that the over-pressure has damaged the gauge. No, I don’t think it’s a bad gauge, just a broken one. However, check with the gauge manufacturer to be sure. Good luck.

peter
peter
July 3, 2017 10:42 pm

i purchased a new dewalt 165psi , 6 gallon pancake compressor DWFP55126. the tank gauge works fine,it turns on and off at the correct cut in/off points. my issue is with the regulator, when i set it to 90psi and use a nailer or just the blow gun, the pressure more than not does not return to 90psi after i discharge some air. sometimes it goes as low as 75-80 psi and as high as 100psi,basically the pressure it returns to or at least what the gauge says is totally random it seems, any ideas? likely just a bad regulator or am i expecting to much for the regulator to return to 90 psi exactly? or within a few psi atleast

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Reply to  peter
July 4, 2017 7:27 am

Peter, my experience has been that a general purpose regulator like the one on your DeWalt DWFP55126 has an accuracy range of 3-5 PSI over or under the set point. For purposes of air compressing and using air in air tools, for most of us that’s plenty accurate. Having said that, what you say is happening is that you have, for example, 90 PSI set on the regulator, you use your air nailer, and rather than maintaining close to the 90 PSI output pressure, your regulator pressure setting varies widely, and the available air pressure to the air tool drops to well below the 90 PSI. Before taking the compressor back and asking for a new one, I suggest you read this, and other pages in the same section on the troubleshooting pages: http://fix-my-compressor.com/compressed-air-will-not-come-out-of-the-air-hose/ just to double check.

peter
peter
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 4, 2017 6:15 pm

Thanks for your reply. i dont believe there is any problem with air flow as the nailer works perfectly as does the blow gun.

if i turn the compressor off, the regulator pressure ‘will drop at the same rate and read the same as the tank pressure, in this regard the regulator gauge seems to work fine.

a couple things may mean something and may not, bare with me haha.

if i let very small amounts of air out of the blow gun( say ten little puff) the psi will need to fall 10 points down to 80 or 81ish psi before it will increase back up to 90psi or there abouts.

secondly, with the psi set at 90 and left there, i pull the release valve to let air out all the air, down to empty and then start the compressor, the tank fills normally to 165psi, the regulated pressure goes a little over 100psi. left untouched after about 3 or 4 minutes the pressure drops to 90psi. if this is all normal please just say so, i am not sure if i am nit picking or really have a faulty unit, thanks!

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  peter
July 4, 2017 9:58 pm

If you turn the compressor off, and bleed air from the tank, yes, the regulator gauge reading will match the tank gauge reading once the tank pressure drops to the regulated pressure of the regulator, and both will drop to zero.

If you blow air out of the tank with a blow gun on a line, briefly, ten little puffs (hard to be sure what those are since I’m not seeing what you mean by that) the regulator should not drop by 10 PSI. If the tank pressure is 165 PSI, and the regulator is set for 90 PSI, the regulator should not blip 2-3 psi for a second or more before stabilizing back at 90 PSI.

If the regulator is set to 90 PSI, and from an empty tank, if the tank fills to 165 PSI, the regulator gauge reading should stop at 90 PSI – or whatever the setting was – and not go up to 100 + PSI and the slowly drop.

In my opinion, your regulator is failing.

peter
peter
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 4, 2017 11:42 pm

that is my opinion also, thank you very much!

Ray Boylan
Ray Boylan
May 25, 2017 6:03 pm

I have a Campbell Hausfeld WL802600AJ, 155PSI, 29 gal tank. The Regulator and both gauges and outlet valve receivers are ll one unit. When I turn my regulator knob counter clock wise (lower), the pressure releases from both the tool outlet and the tank gauges. I cannot remove the regulator and turn it around to face the outlet valves, it does not come apart. Do I need to buy an entire new unit?

Additionally, the regulator comes attached to a manifold. It is part # WL024502AV or WL022500AV. I will try to add a PIC. All regulator knob settings, adjusts both gauges to the same pressure level. It sets the Tool valve pressure quickly, then continues to bleed air from the tank, the air comes from under the regulator knob.

/ Ray

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Reply to  Ray Boylan
May 26, 2017 7:02 pm

I’ve put your two posts together. Thanks for the added info. It does sound as though the regulator diaphragm has cracked, or a seal has let go, Ray. If you search for parts for your compressor, you will see the much of what is attached to the “manifold” can be removed. You can, then, make the base manifold from brass parts from a good plumbing wholesaler, and add the removed parts to that. You can add a new regulator then, and they aren’t too expensive. If you want to keep it simple, and you can find one, yup, you can replace the whole manifold too.

John
John
March 24, 2017 2:28 pm

Hi,

I am pretty new to the world of air compressors and I am trying to better understand how I can utilize air regulators. Here is my question. I have a very large towable air compressor that produces around 185CFM at 100 psi. I have a dessicant air dryer that has a three stage filter that is connected inline between the tool and the compressor. This dryer is rated at 142PSI and about 40CFM airflow. My tool requires at least 30 cfm at 100psi. My questions is whether or not an air regulator installed between the air compressor and the dessicant air dryer would allow me to safely use the air dryer with this large air compressor. Do air regulators allow you to use tools and filters that are rated way lower than the compressor in terms of PSI and CFM? I hope I am making sense. I have heard of tools and filters exploding from too much pressure. Thank you

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Reply to  John
March 25, 2017 5:07 pm

Sorry John. I’m not getting it. Your compressor is putting out 100 PSI, yes? Your desiccant dryer is rated for 142 PSI. The air tool needs 100 PSI. So what is the problem? Is it that the 185 CFM coming out of the compressor will overwhelm the dryer? That being the case, you’ll want to put a manual valve (not a regulator, but a valve) to be able to reduce the flow to the level necessary. The regulator is there to adjust the downstream pressure, the valve is there to adjust the flow, even though, in some cases, the regulator does both, it wouldn’t in my opinion in this case. You’ll need some way to measure the flow, or just take post luck, and see if cutting the flow in half, for example, allows enough drying of the air that the air tool isn’t encumbered.

AJ
AJ
December 23, 2016 4:03 pm

Hello All,

I have an Ingersoll and Rand water trap regulator. It has been working well for 8 months until today. The regulator still does it job at lower psi’s, but once I try to spray at higher pressures, it shoots straight to 150psi and stays there. I don’t want to buy a new one as they run around $100, any ideas about how dire this problem is and what I could do to fix it?

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Reply to  AJ
December 23, 2016 4:25 pm

By water trap regulator, I take that to mean that it is a combination filter/regulator?

If 150 PSI is the upper pressure output of your compressor, then I would suspect either the spring in the regulator is going and / or the diaphragm is failing too. The flow capacity and port size will be the deciding factors in replacing it, AJ, though some of these better quality regulators do have repair kits that cost less than a replacement regulator. If you google repair kit for XX (port size) IR regulator, you may find sources.

kurt brees
kurt brees
November 30, 2016 1:28 pm

I bought a used DeVilbiss Pro Air 2, model # 430-1 , max pressure 125. When I turned it on the first time, it built up pressure to about 125 and air started coming out of the small relief hole below the pressure line on the regulator.

I was able to find a new regulator and installed it. Same thing. It built up pressure until about 125 and air started coming out of the small relief hole at the base of the metal pressure line attached to the regulator. It will continue to bleed off until the tank is empty unless it is turned on again. It holds the pressure will running but not while not running.

Any ideas what is happening? Thanks, Kurt

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  kurt brees
November 30, 2016 4:51 pm

Hi Kurt. My guess is that you’ve got a leaking tank check valve. Perhaps you might remove it, clean the seats, and replace it and then check and see if the problem persists? Make sure you’ve dumped all the air before disassembling the fitting on the tank. Let me know how it turns out would you?

yetsedaw
yetsedaw
November 26, 2016 4:20 am

hi everyone my question is i set my compressor outlet @2.5bar but when it compress down to 2 bar when it use from tank it rise to the previous so how can i fix it

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  yetsedaw
November 27, 2016 5:28 pm

A bit more clarification please. If the regulator is set for 2.5 bar, that’s the pressure that the air tool will see, as long as the air pressure in the tank stays above 2.5 bar. If the tank pressure falls below 2.5 bar, the regulator can no longer maintain the downstream pressure. That would suggest to me that whatever you are using air for is pulling more air than the compressor can generate. Is this what is happening?

SethD
SethD
October 11, 2016 11:27 pm

I have an air compressor that I just purchased. When I decrease the air pressure the regulator leaks until the pressure of the entire tank matches the setting on the regulator. Any idea what is wrong?

Jack Schnabel
Jack Schnabel
Reply to  SethD
November 13, 2016 8:38 am

It’s working correctly. It’s just bleeding off the pressure in out going side of the line.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Jack Schnabel
November 17, 2016 1:28 pm

Okay. So you say the regulator is “working correctly”? Nope, not if it’s bleeding air. Did you determine if the arrow on the regulator is pointing to the discharge coupler or towards the tank?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  SethD
October 12, 2016 10:32 pm

It sounds as though the regulator is installed backwards. By that we mean that the arrow on the regulator is pointing towards the tank, and not towards the discharge coupler. Try – with the tank empty and the power cord pulled from the socket – removing the regulator and reversing the flow. Let us know if this helps, will you?

Jen
Jen
September 18, 2016 1:24 pm

Hi,
I have an Iwata Smart Jet Pro that has developed a problem. I was unable suddenly to turn the pressure regulator knob. At the same time the pressure gauge stopped working, not budging from zero despite the compressor blasting air to my airbrush. I assumed that the problem stemmed from the pressure knob. I took advice and removed the knob cap and loosened off the nut. I can now move the knob again, however the dial still does not adjust the pressure and the gauge still does not move. My airbrush blasts air, but I have no control over the amount. Any advice on how to solve this will be gratefully received,

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Reply to  Jen
September 19, 2016 1:47 pm

Short of tearing down the existing regulator, trying to determine what part(s) has failed, trying to find the part(s) and then reassembling, replacing the whole regulator would be the choice as far as we’re concerned. These regulators are not expensive. Just make sure when you install the new one that you point the arrow on the body of the regulator towards the discharge coupler – the coupler into which you plug your air line.

John
John
August 9, 2016 12:16 pm

My air regulator knob is very hard to turn. Is there a lubricant that should be used? It’s not leaking.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  John
August 10, 2016 5:10 pm

No lubricate that we know of. If pushing or pulling on the regulator knob provides no benefit, we can only assume that some air borne debris has created a friction issue inside and it may be time to replace the regulator.

romey
romey
July 19, 2016 12:03 pm

Hi Willyr,

first off, thank you for this site and the wealth of information shared! i’m a compressor newb and learning along the way. Anyway, my question is with regards to my old sears/craftsman compressor (model 919.717521 2hp) from 1980 (bought from the original owner and it’s in beautiful shape!). I think there’s a leak somewhere in the regulator. I’ve tried googling for parts kits and ended up talking to a bunch of compressor repair guys who keep referring me to someone else!

anyway, can i still rebuild this regulator or should i just try and get an aftermarket one to try and fit in? will there be any issues with that? with the compressor off, there are no leaks, it only hisses/leaks when i spin the regulator on and it sounds like it’s coming from around the regulator itself. i’ve heard cracked diaphragm from the same guys above. just wanting to confirm this diagnosis first and your thoughts on the fix.

‘preciate any tips/advice! (hope pics work)
cheers
romey

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  romey
July 19, 2016 9:09 pm

Okay, the image came through fine Romney, and we see the regulator. We expect that you will have a hard time finding parts for this regulator, though the people to ask about this for sure are at Sears service. Assuming you cannot, we expect with some manipulation a general purpose, panel mount regulator can be fitted into the hole in the cover, and plumb into the discharge line from the tank. Take the old regulator to the big box store if you cannot find an OEM regulator, and try to find one that is similar in panel mount size. Don’t worry about the plumbing, in as much as straight and elbow fittings which are readily available can be used to plumb the regulator into the line. It, however, may not maintain the dignity of “the old girl” but it should come close. As to the leak, the regulator should vent while you are dialing the pressure down if you have an air hose attached to the discharge coupler. It should not normally leak when you are dialing the pressure up, so we concur, that if that’s what is happening, it’s most likely a cracked diaphragm.

romey
romey
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
July 20, 2016 11:08 am

Thanks for the speedy reply WillyR! very much appreciated! Yes, definitely leaking when dialing up. looks like it’s a one piece unit with the tank pressure gauge off the manifold so i’m guessing i’ll be needing to replace both with some dual unit and or separate units with like you said, figuring out the best fit with some plumbing. guess i can even live without the plastic console cover on worse comes to worse

piece 74 is a pipe plug on the manifold so i’m guessing that’s a possible option for relocating a certain aftermarket piece where i just use that outlet and plug the old location for the regulator?

will see what i can find at Sears too but i’m guessing it’ll be an aftermarket/modded piece which is a-okay!

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  romey
July 20, 2016 6:16 pm

As long as the regulator has access to air from the tank, then where you plumb it is up to you. Good luck.

romey
romey
Reply to  romey
July 20, 2016 11:16 am

just adding more pics

romey
romey
Reply to  romey
July 20, 2016 11:21 am

Gave compressor a little cleaning.

romey
romey
Reply to  romey
July 20, 2016 11:16 am

here you can see the pipe plug on top of the compressor manifold

romey
romey
Reply to  romey
July 19, 2016 12:12 pm

just to add, i’m looking at part 69/70. guess i can take a real pic with the cover off. also would like to the new parts (if needed) to at least fit as closely as it can through the 3 holes in the plastic cover (or am I asking too much?! )

one of the techs i spoke to even suggested skipping or plugging the regulator and just running straight off the tank. but i’m thinking that’s probably not a good idea (wasting air, and running too high PSI through the tools/recommendations and wearing them out)

i got this compressor for a song and would hate to see it go to waste. i also forgot to add that i’m still about to run a 220 V outlet in the garage to run this baby. it’s been sitting there for a couple years so plan is to drain tank of water and to change the oil and give her a good clean. cheers.

Loni Wulff
Loni Wulff
July 17, 2016 5:00 pm

Hi, I just installed a Kobalt 3/8 in regulator on my twin tank Central Pneumatic wheelbarrow compressor. I bought it used and when I ran it it would pop off at 150 tank pressure. This regulator continuously bleeds off pressure and won’t let me get any higher than 60 psi and tank pressure can’t build any higher than 70; did I just install a broken piece of junk?

Cody
Cody
Reply to  Loni Wulff
August 9, 2016 7:10 pm

I’m having the same issues with the cobalt regulator, it continually bleeds ( seems to be out of the handle)

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Loni Wulff
July 19, 2016 9:01 pm

Loni, we’re a bit confused. You speak of the Kobalt regulator, and then refer to it popping off at 150 PSI. The regulator does not “pop off”. Are you, perhaps, referring to the PRV?

If you are referring to the regulator, please confirm that you have installed it with the arrow on the regulator body pointing towards the discharge coupler, and NOT towards the tank. If it is pointing to the tank, remove the regulator and install it with the correct flow path. That should stop the leak.

Sunday
Sunday
June 21, 2016 1:53 pm

I have a mini air compressor are the air tank pressure and the air regulator suppose to read the same . My tank reads over 200 in the red the regulator shuts off at around 100

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Sunday
June 23, 2016 9:17 am

We are a bit confused by your question. The regulator does not shut anything off. It is adjusted by a knob to set the downstream air pressure at the level you want for your air tools. If the regulator is set for 100 PSI for example, and the tank has 150 PSI in it, then the downstream air tools will get a steady stream of air at the 100 PSI you have selected on the regulator dial.

If the air compressor is running tank pressure up to 200 PSI, and the normal cut out point of the compressors is, for example, 150 PSI, then it’s pretty certain that your pressure switch has failed, and we would recommend that you do not use the compressor again until that is repaired.

Keith
Keith
June 17, 2016 2:08 pm

Howdy, I have an old Emglo MK5HGA-8P compressor and the regulator screw broke. It is an old enough unit that I can’t find parts anywhere for it. The regulator screws into a manifold and comes apart easily, do you know of anywhere to get parts or do you know of a screw in replacement that will go in the manifold?

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Keith
June 20, 2016 2:38 pm

Indeed, it seems that the regulator repair kit for this wheelbarrow compressor is no longer available. The further issue is, we do not have access to the compressor to unscrew the regulator to see how we could effect a replacement. We would not expect that the regulator is too unusual, and you may be able to install a replacement. The first thing to do is to remove the control panel cover and get a look at the regulator plumbing. We would expect it to be a normal regulator, and if so, any comparably sized regulator should work. If you wish, please start a new thread in this forum and add some closeup photos of the regulator area with the panel cover removed. Let’s see what’s under there.

Chris Larson
Chris Larson
April 6, 2016 3:19 pm

Aloha. I have an old military compressor, probably 80 gallons or so. It’s set to shut off at 147psi and turn back on at about 117psi. The tank has its own gauge, the regulator has a gauge and I put one after the regulator before the tool’s hose. I drained all the air out of the compressor and the hose end, unscrewed the pressure set knob all the way to the stop and filled the compressor tank. All three gauges read 147psi. Shouldn’t the out pressure be much lower than the tank with the pressure set knob backed off all the way? I’m thinking I bought a faulty regulator. I’m not hearing any air leak from the regulator.
Thanks,
Chris

(UPDATE: Disregard the question. I took it apart and found that the adjustment screw was stripped.)

Chris, we’ve included both your question and upates as your findings will, we are sure, help others with a similar regulator problem.

Joel H
Joel H
February 10, 2016 8:00 pm

So I’m not much a DIY’er, but a couple Christmases ago my father-in-law bought me a Porter Cable 150 psi air compressor. Embarrassingly I just tried to use it for the first time today to air up a low tire on my car. I followed the instructions about attaching the tube and proper fitting, turned the regulator pressure knob fully counter-clockwise and turned it on. When the tank air pressure reached about 140 psi it shut off and I turned the regulator knob clockwise and was going to set the regulator pressure to about 100 psi. As I turned the regulator knob the tank pressure decreased and the motor started running again, before the pressure in the regulator reached even 20 psi. That’s not normal, is it? Any help is appreciated.

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Joel H
February 13, 2016 5:53 pm

Please shut the regulator off, run the compressor until the tan pressure reaches the cut out setting and the compressor stops, then dial the regulator back up. Monitor the TANK air gauge. How fast is it dropping?

In order for the compressor to start, assuming the pressure switch is working properly, the tank pressure must drop to below the cut in pressure setting of the pressure switch.

If the tank pressure is dropping while you are dialing up the regulator, and if your regulator is installed correctly, then typically the only place the air can escape is out the regulator relief hole. If that is happening, it is the regulator at fault and a repair or replacement is in order.

Karl
Karl
August 26, 2015 5:43 pm

I have a ABAC Pole Position Compressor 2HP / 24Lt – It is just a cheap model and fairly old.
My question is regarding the Pressure gauge and regulator – this seams to be 1 unit on my item and only has 1 gauge which shows the pressure of the tank, The regulator only has numbers round a twist knob however it has come loose and so the numbers do not match the reality i.e. when on number 3 air is only just escaping.
Do you have any ideas how to fix this? Can I repair it, if so how will I know if the pressure is correct.
Another option will be to replace the regulator – any help identifying the right one would be helpful.
Thanks

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Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Karl
August 26, 2015 7:14 pm

We tried to find an image of the compressor to better understand the problem. No luck, we’re afraid. Simply put, air from the compressor tank flows to the base of the pressure switch so that it can “read” the tank pressure and turn the compressor on an off as needed. That plumbing typically has the tank air gauge installed as well, so the compressor user can monitor the air pressure in the tank. The air then flows typically to a regulator that has its own gauge. The regulator gauge displays the pressure setting the downstream air tool or air-using application will receive. We would suggest that you install a tee upstream from the regulator and install a gauge there. Replace the regulator on your compressor will a general purpose mini-regulator, that will come with a gauge, and then plumb your compressors discharge coupling into the downstream side of the regulator. That should solve your problem.

Karl
Karl
Reply to  Fix My Compressor Moderator
August 27, 2015 6:34 pm

Hi thanks for the reply I think it makes sense. To help here is picture of the offending item.

ABAC Pole Position compressor regulator

Karl
Karl
Reply to  Karl
August 27, 2015 9:06 pm

After much searching found this which is the actual part.

I think it is time to replace 🙂

Fix My Compressor Moderator
Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Karl
August 28, 2015 9:35 am

Yes, it’s easier to acquire the exact same item. Yet you can also acquire a regulator like this, Karl, which will do the same job and you see the pressure setting on the gauge which might be easier.
General purpose mini-air regulator

Chad Murrow
Chad Murrow
June 26, 2015 7:59 pm

I have a Craftsman air compressor model number 919.167280. It has pressure regulator D27253. The nut on the inside of the regulator has stripped out and now the regulator won’t keep pressure. Does anyone know of a place to get a replacement nut for the regulator. I know they are most likely disposable, but a new regulator is around $60 and I can’t bring myself to pay that when all I need is a $.05 nut. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Fix My Compressor Moderator
Fix My Compressor Moderator
Reply to  Chad Murrow
June 28, 2015 10:16 am

Craftsman air compressor model 919.167280
Chad, when we look at the image of your model of Craftsman air compressor, it seems clear that what your compressor needs is a low cost regulator, to replace your damaged one, since parts for mini regulators are almost impossible to find. The replacement air regulator need not be an OEM regulator which, you say, will cost $60. If you Google mini air regulator, you will find many sources for one that suits your compressor, and they cost $15-$20.